Research

This section of the College Autism Network website presents three distinct sets of research-related resources.

 

CAN Fast Fact #10

Fast Fact #10 College Success Means More than Just Grades

Fast Fact #10 College Success Means More than Just Grades Researchers asked students “how do you define success as a college student?” Their answers suggest students seek accomplishment both inside and outside the classroom.   Source: Accardo, A. L. (2017)....
CAN Fast Fact 9 - 2018-07-30

Fast Fact #9 Mentoring can be more than academic.

Typical accommodations for students with autism in higher education focus on academic issues. But students with autism might also benefit from mentors focused on social and emotional needs. Such guidance would be especially important for students just beginning their college experience.

Fast Fact #8 Why don’t accommodations always work?

Formal accommodations may not adequately support students’ academic needs. One reason for this deficiency is that student accommodations are not always fulfilled by teachers, which can be very challenging for students.

CAN Fast Fact 7 - Image - 2018-07-02

Fast Fact #7: Accommodations and Support in Higher Education: Insights from the Autism Community

Formal accommodations may not adequately support students’ academic needs. One reason for this deficiency is that student accommodations are not always fulfilled by teachers, which can be very challenging for students.

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[Event] INSAR2018 – Are Autistic Students More Stigmatized Than Other Types of Neurodiverse College Students?

We compared stigma towards college students with different disorders and examined factors that contribute to stigma towards autism in particular. Findings suggest that autism is less stigmatized on college campuses than disorders like psychopathy and schizophrenia which may be perceived as dangerous. Indeed, stigma towards the label “autism” was associated with perceived dangerousness. Stigma was consistently related to quality of prior contact with autism, suggesting that interventions which put autistic students into high quality contact with peers are powerful tools for stigma reduction.

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Our Research

Members of the CAN team are actively generating new scholarship related to college students with autism. The products of this work (including conference papers, presentations, and posters) categorized as “original research” on this website.

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Literature Reviews

The CAN team regularly reviews other scholars’ articles published in peer-reviewed journals. We hope to make this body of research more user-friendly and readily accessible by providing a summary of each article, offering a brief critique, and discussing the implications of the findings.

Training

Types of Supports

There are numerous supports available for college students on the spectrum. It can be confusing and overwhelming to decide what is right for you or your student. We created these resources after research into various college support programs to help guide you through the process of finding a college that is the best fit for your situation.

Quick Links: Key organizations, services, and resources for students and advocates
Issue BriefIndividuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are completing high school with reasonable expectations for postsecondary success. College educators are likely ill prepared to provide appropriate support for these students.
 
 
 
Fast Fact #1Why do only 1 in 225 new college students report having autism?
 
 
 
 
Journal of College Student Development: A large and fast-growing population of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are completing high school with reasonable expectations for postsecondary success. However, without empirical literature to guide them, college educators are likely ill prepared to provide appropriate support for these students. Drawing from personal interviews with a diverse group of students with autism...

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The College Autism Network (CAN) is a nonprofit organization run almost entirely by dedicated professionals and students who volunteer their time, resources, and expertise to support college success for students with autism.

But websites, videos, curricula, presentations, and events cost money.
So we need your help!

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