The College Autism Network is a national nonprofit organization linking varied stakeholders engaged in evidence-based efforts to improve access, experiences, and outcomes for college students with autism.

[Event] INSAR2018 – Are Autistic Students More Stigmatized Than Other Types of Neurodiverse College Students

We compared stigma towards college students with different disorders and examined factors that contribute to stigma towards autism in particular. Findings suggest that autism is less stigmatized on college campuses than disorders like psychopathy and schizophrenia which may be perceived as dangerous. Indeed, stigma towards the label “autism” was associated with perceived dangerousness. Stigma was consistently related to quality of prior contact with autism, suggesting that interventions which put autistic students into high quality contact with peers are powerful tools for stigma reduction.

[Short Sheet] Housing & Residence Life

A 1-page introduction to college students with autism for housing and residential life professionals.

[Event] INSAR2018 – Peer Responses to Autism-Related Behaviors in a Postsecondary Classes

Results indicate that students responded more positively 1) when primed to consider ASD, and 2) when required interaction is lower.

Fast Fact #6 – Family Matters

Fast Fact #6 Family Matters... To Continuous Employment and Education! “There were no significant associations between group and any of the individual factors (i.e., IQ, adaptive behavior, autism severity, behavior problems, and stress reactivity). In terms of family factors, relative to parents of youth without a disruption, parents of those who experienced a vocational/PSE disruption had higher depressive and anxiety symptoms and lower quality of life when their son/daughter was in high school…” (Taylor & DaWalt, 2017, p.4029) This material is based, in part, upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1612090. Keep up to date with the College Autism Network as we continually update our resources. Sign up here to receive periodic emails about new advocacy initiatives, research findings, and training materials. We'll send no more than one email per week, and you can unsubscribe...

Fast Fact #5 – Half of the youth with autism did not experience any disruption in education or employment after high school.

Fast Fact #5 Half of the youth with autism did not experience any disruption in education or employment after high school. Among the 36 youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)... * 10 people remained in the same activity since high school. * 8 people experienced upward mobility (either “becoming employed while maintaining enrollment in postsecondary education, taking a few classes to being a full time student, going from a sheltered pre-vocational setting to a supported joy or going from no activities to a supported job”) after high school. *16 people experienced a disruption in education or employment. * 2 people did not participate in any of the reported activities after high school exit. This material is based, in part, upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1612090. Keep up to date with the College Autism Network as we continually update our resources. Sign up here to receive periodic emails about new advocacy initiatives, research findings,...

Fast Fact #4 – We all fall down

Fast Fact #4 We all fall down, but we get up again! In Taylor and DaWalt’s recent study, about half of the participants experienced some “disruption,” like being fired, or leaving a post-secondary education program. Out of those 8 participants who experienced some sort of disruption in their employment or education, 7 found another opportunity by the end of the study. It is a widely held idea that people with autism struggle with employment. This study suggests that the problem might be maintaining employment. With that in mind, more research needs to go into supports which help people with autism maintain steady employment and education opportunities.   This material is based, in part, upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1612090. Keep up to date with the College Autism Network as we continually update our resources. Sign up here to receive periodic emails about new advocacy initiatives, research findings, and training materials. We'll send no...

Journal of College Student Development

  Cox, B. E., Thompson, K., Anderson, A., Mintz, A., Locks, T. Morgan, L., Edelstein, J., & Wolz, A. (2017). College experiences for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): Personal identity, public disclosure, and institutional support. Journal of College Student Development, 58(1), 71-87. ABSTRACT A large and fast-growing population of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are completing high school with reasonable expectations for postsecondary success. However, without empirical literature to guide them, college educators are likely ill prepared to provide appropriate support for these students. Drawing from personal interviews with a diverse group of students with autism, the current study (1) amplifies these students' voices, (2) describes tensions between their public and private identities, (3) outlines the academic, social, emotional, self-advocacy, and communication challenges they face in college, and (4) proposes both general principles and specific...

Autism Coming to College (Issue Brief)

In this issue brief: Highlights from the first article in top-tier higher education journal to ever mention autism. A new model to help students and institutions anticipate, address, and overcome challenges that might otherwise undermine the chances of success for college students with autism. Description of $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation: “Autism-Related Characteristics in College STEM students: Prevalence, Performance, and Mediation.” Links to additional resources including handouts, slides, literature reviews, news stories, and more! Students with autism are coming to college... By the year 2020, as many as 433,000 students with autism will be enrolled in college. The number of college students with autism is growing at a rate faster than nearly any other demographic. With potential for success, especially in STEM fields... Many individuals with autism achieve academically at the same or higher levels than their typical peers, and would likely...

Support CAN – Become a Member

The College Autism Network (CAN) is a nonprofit organization run almost entirely by dedicated professionals and students who volunteer their time, resources, and expertise to support college success for students with autism.

But websites, videos, curricula, presentations, and events cost money.
So we need your help!

College experiences for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Personal identity, public disclosure, and institutional support.

Journal of College Student Development (2017). 58(1), 71-87.

 

Autism Coming to College (Issue Brief 2017)

A 4-page introduction to autism on campus.

The College Autism Network is a national nonprofit organization linking varied stakeholders engaged in evidence-based efforts to improve access, experiences, and outcomes for college students with autism.

Support CAN – Become a Member

The College Autism Network (CAN) is a nonprofit organization run almost entirely by dedicated professionals and students who volunteer their time, resources, and expertise to support college success for students with autism.

But websites, videos, curricula, presentations, and events cost money.
So we need your help!

College experiences for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Personal identity, public disclosure, and institutional support.

Journal of College Student Development (2017). 58(1), 71-87.

 

Autism Coming to College (Issue Brief 2017)

A 4-page introduction to autism on campus.

CAN’s Latest Research and Resources

[Event] INSAR2018 – Are Autistic Students More Stigmatized Than Other Types of Neurodiverse College Students

We compared stigma towards college students with different disorders and examined factors that contribute to stigma towards autism in particular. Findings suggest that autism is less stigmatized on college campuses than disorders like psychopathy and schizophrenia which may be perceived as dangerous. Indeed, stigma towards the label “autism” was associated with perceived dangerousness. Stigma was consistently related to quality of prior contact with autism, suggesting that interventions which put autistic students into high quality contact with peers are powerful tools for stigma reduction.

[Short Sheet] Housing & Residence Life

A 1-page introduction to college students with autism for housing and residential life professionals.

[Event] INSAR2018 – Peer Responses to Autism-Related Behaviors in a Postsecondary Classes

Results indicate that students responded more positively 1) when primed to consider ASD, and 2) when required interaction is lower.

Fast Fact #6 – Family Matters

Fast Fact #6 Family Matters... To Continuous Employment and Education! “There were no significant associations between group and any of the individual factors (i.e., IQ, adaptive behavior, autism severity, behavior problems, and stress reactivity). In terms of family factors, relative to parents of youth without a disruption, parents of those who experienced a vocational/PSE disruption had higher depressive and anxiety symptoms and lower quality of life when their son/daughter was in high school…” (Taylor & DaWalt, 2017, p.4029) This material is based, in part, upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1612090. Keep up to date with the College Autism Network as we continually update our resources. Sign up here to receive periodic emails about new advocacy initiatives, research findings, and training materials. We'll send no more than one email per week, and you can unsubscribe...

Fast Fact #5 – Half of the youth with autism did not experience any disruption in education or employment after high school.

Fast Fact #5 Half of the youth with autism did not experience any disruption in education or employment after high school. Among the 36 youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)... * 10 people remained in the same activity since high school. * 8 people experienced upward mobility (either “becoming employed while maintaining enrollment in postsecondary education, taking a few classes to being a full time student, going from a sheltered pre-vocational setting to a supported joy or going from no activities to a supported job”) after high school. *16 people experienced a disruption in education or employment. * 2 people did not participate in any of the reported activities after high school exit. This material is based, in part, upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1612090. Keep up to date with the College Autism Network as we continually update our resources. Sign up here to receive periodic emails about new advocacy initiatives, research findings,...

Fast Fact #4 – We all fall down

Fast Fact #4 We all fall down, but we get up again! In Taylor and DaWalt’s recent study, about half of the participants experienced some “disruption,” like being fired, or leaving a post-secondary education program. Out of those 8 participants who experienced some sort of disruption in their employment or education, 7 found another opportunity by the end of the study. It is a widely held idea that people with autism struggle with employment. This study suggests that the problem might be maintaining employment. With that in mind, more research needs to go into supports which help people with autism maintain steady employment and education opportunities.   This material is based, in part, upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1612090. Keep up to date with the College Autism Network as we continually update our resources. Sign up here to receive periodic emails about new advocacy initiatives, research findings, and training materials. We'll send no...

Journal of College Student Development

  Cox, B. E., Thompson, K., Anderson, A., Mintz, A., Locks, T. Morgan, L., Edelstein, J., & Wolz, A. (2017). College experiences for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): Personal identity, public disclosure, and institutional support. Journal of College Student Development, 58(1), 71-87. ABSTRACT A large and fast-growing population of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are completing high school with reasonable expectations for postsecondary success. However, without empirical literature to guide them, college educators are likely ill prepared to provide appropriate support for these students. Drawing from personal interviews with a diverse group of students with autism, the current study (1) amplifies these students' voices, (2) describes tensions between their public and private identities, (3) outlines the academic, social, emotional, self-advocacy, and communication challenges they face in college, and (4) proposes both general principles and specific...

Autism Coming to College (Issue Brief)

In this issue brief: Highlights from the first article in top-tier higher education journal to ever mention autism. A new model to help students and institutions anticipate, address, and overcome challenges that might otherwise undermine the chances of success for college students with autism. Description of $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation: “Autism-Related Characteristics in College STEM students: Prevalence, Performance, and Mediation.” Links to additional resources including handouts, slides, literature reviews, news stories, and more! Students with autism are coming to college... By the year 2020, as many as 433,000 students with autism will be enrolled in college. The number of college students with autism is growing at a rate faster than nearly any other demographic. With potential for success, especially in STEM fields... Many individuals with autism achieve academically at the same or higher levels than their typical peers, and would likely...

What We Do

Advocacy Image

Advocacy

We empower college students with autism by amplifying their voices within the academic community and by providing free access to materials designed to facilitate their successful transition into, through, and out of college.

Research-Image

Research

We facilitate research that uses qualitative and quantitative methods to examine the systemic, institutional, and personal conditions that shape college access, experiences, and outcomes for students on the autism spectrum.

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Training

We conduct professional development workshops and distribute training materials to administrators, researchers, students, parents, and instructors.

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