Advocacy

This section of the College Autism Network website presents three distinct sets of advocacy-related resources.

 

Latest updates from the College Autism Network…

CAN Fast Fact #10

Fast Fact #10 College Success Means More than Just Grades

Fast Fact #10 College Success Means More than Just Grades Researchers asked students “how do you define success as a college student?” Their answers suggest students seek accomplishment both inside and outside the classroom.   Source: Accardo, A. L. (2017)....
CAN Fast Fact 9 - 2018-07-30

Fast Fact #9 Mentoring can be more than academic.

Typical accommodations for students with autism in higher education focus on academic issues. But students with autism might also benefit from mentors focused on social and emotional needs. Such guidance would be especially important for students just beginning their college experience.

Fast Fact #8 Why don’t accommodations always work?

Formal accommodations may not adequately support students’ academic needs. One reason for this deficiency is that student accommodations are not always fulfilled by teachers, which can be very challenging for students.

CAN Fast Fact 7 - Image - 2018-07-02

Fast Fact #7: Accommodations and Support in Higher Education: Insights from the Autism Community

Formal accommodations may not adequately support students’ academic needs. One reason for this deficiency is that student accommodations are not always fulfilled by teachers, which can be very challenging for students.

Gillespie-Lynch-Stigma-IMFAR-1

[Event] INSAR2018 – Are Autistic Students More Stigmatized Than Other Types of Neurodiverse College Students?

We compared stigma towards college students with different disorders and examined factors that contribute to stigma towards autism in particular. Findings suggest that autism is less stigmatized on college campuses than disorders like psychopathy and schizophrenia which may be perceived as dangerous. Indeed, stigma towards the label “autism” was associated with perceived dangerousness. Stigma was consistently related to quality of prior contact with autism, suggesting that interventions which put autistic students into high quality contact with peers are powerful tools for stigma reduction.

Advocacy Image

Blog

Members of the CAN team occasionally outline emerging findings, explore creative ideas, present opportunities for involvement, or reflect on the implications of our work. These musings are categorized as “blog posts” on this website.

Research-Image

News

Whenever we see interesting stories presented in popular media (e.g., newspapers, magazines, TV), we will share them via items categorized as “news” on this website

Training-Image

Institutional Initiatives

There are numerous supports out there for college students on the spectrum. It can be confusing to decide what is right for you and what programs fit your needs. Through research into autism support programs at higher education institutions in the US, we have compiled this list to inform students, parents, and educators about what is available to help students find the program that best fits their needs.

Quick Links: Key organizations, services, and resources for students and advocates

College Autism Spectrum: independent organization of professionals whose purpose is to assist students with autism spectrum disorders, and their families.

Wrong Planet: web community designed for individuals (and parents / professionals of those) with Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, ADHD, PDDs, and other neurological differences.

Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN): activities include public policy advocacy, the development of Autistic cultural activities, and leadership training for Autistic self-advocates

Support CAN – Become a Member

The College Autism Network (CAN) is a nonprofit organization run almost entirely by dedicated professionals and students who volunteer their time, resources, and expertise to support college success for students with autism.

But websites, videos, curricula, presentations, and events cost money.
So we need your help!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This